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Seattle piloting innovative financing model for building efficiency

By Benjamin Romano
Xconomy

Seattle’s municipal utility and the people behind one of the world’s most-efficient commercial buildings are trying to reinvent the business model for financing so-called deep energy efficiency improvements, which could generate hundreds of billions of dollars of construction activity and energy savings, and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Seattle piloting innovative financing model for building efficiency

Bullitt Center

Seattle’s municipal utility and the people behind one of the world’s most-efficient commercial buildings are trying to reinvent the business model for financing so-called deep energy efficiency improvements, which could generate hundreds of billions of dollars of construction activity and energy savings, and significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Seattle City Light and the Bullitt Foundation plan to enter a first-of-its-kind contract that would quantify the energy savings of the Bullitt Center relative to a standard commercial building and pay for them more like utility energy purchases. The goal is to unlock the low-cost capital necessary to do what energy efficiency experts like to call “deep” improvements, projects—far beyond replacing the light bulbs—that can cut a building’s energy use in half.

A pilot project to begin later this year will focus on the 50,000-square-foot Bullitt Center, a new commercial office building meant to showcase and validate the latest in sustainable and efficient designs, technologies, operations, and business models. The building is already distinguished by its solar roof, composting toilets, rainwater harvesting, and other elements.

This latest experiment—which could address flaws in the model for financing deep energy efficiency improvements—”has the potential to be enormously important,” says Denis Hayes, Bullitt Foundation president and CEO. “And it will be one of the most difficult of these elements to push over the many hurdles.”

But it is exactly this sort of ambitious business model innovation that is needed to accelerate deployment of a suite of technologies—many of which are already mature—that could begin to put the brakes on runaway climate change, while also saving money and making people more comfortable.

Hayes, who coordinated the first Earth Day in 1970, says current climate change mitigation efforts amount to “little nibbles around the edges,” unequal to the magnitude of the challenge. “We need to figure out some ways to take some really big bites,” he says.

Buildings offer a full meal. They account for about 74 percent of U.S. electricity consumption, which is itself the source of a third of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.

While not all buildings are suitable for the deep energy efficiency improvements targeted by this model—which goes by the acronym MEETS for metered energy efficiency transaction structure—backers say this is an opportunity to unlock hundreds of billions of dollars of potential investment, energy savings, and emissions reductions. Buildings accounted for more than $300 billion in U.S. electricity spending in 2010.

Meet MEETS

The concept for MEETS, as well as a key piece of technology underpinning it, is being developed by a Portland company called Energy Resource Management (EnergyRM). It’s headed by Rob Harmon, who a decade ago helped create another novel transaction structure that is at the heart of the renewable energy market: the retail renewable energy credit (REC), which allows the environmental attributes of a unit of renewable power to be tracked and traded separately from the electricity itself.

“What I see now, and what I saw more than a decade ago with RECs, was a broken transaction structure, where you couldn’t connect willing buyers and sellers,” Harmon says.

To understand what’s broken about the current market for financing energy efficiency, it’s helpful to review some generalized motivations—or lack thereof—of three key players:

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